Corrie Detweiler

Associate Professor

Photo of Corrie Detweiler

Corrella.Detweiler@Colorado.EDU
Phone: (303) 735-2956
EXT: 5-2956
LAB: 2-8555

Website

Lab

Office Location

GOLD A145C

Education

Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco, 1998

Biography

Research Interests:
Host-Pathogen Interactions: How pathogenic bacteria evade and manipulate mammalian immune systems. Molecular mechanisms of Typhoid fever.

Research Profile:
How do microbes persist for years within otherwise healthy hosts? We are interested in identifying and understanding molecular mechanisms that pathogens use to establish and maintain chronic infections. The lab focuses on a model of bacterial chronic disease, Salmonella enterica infection of mice. Salmonellae cause natural systemic infections of mice. Ingested bacteria traverse the gastrointestinal tract lining to gain access to the lymphatic system. Salmonellae establish chronic infection in professional phagocytes, specifically macrophages, in the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Our research aims at understanding the regulation of bacterial signaling pathways important for host infection, the function of the downstream genes, and the nature of the macrophages in which the bacteria reside. We use a combination of bacterial genetics and biochemistry, DNA microarrays, tissue culture, microscopy, and mouse infection models to address these questions.

Selected Publications

A Glycine Betaine Importer Limits Salmonella Stress Resistance and Tissue Colonization by Reducing Trehalose Production.
Pilonieta MC, Nagy TA, Jorgensen DR, Detweiler CS.
Mol Microbiol. 2012 Feb 29. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2958.2012.08022.x.
PMID:

  • 22375627
  • [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Related citations

Salmonella enterica replication in hemophagocytic macrophages requires two type three secretion systems.
Silva-Herzog E, Detweiler CS.
Infect Immun. 2010 Aug;78(8):3369-77. Epub 2010 Jun 1.
PMID:

  • 20515933
  • [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Related citations

Chronic murine typhoid fever is a natural model of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
Brown DE, McCoy MW, Pilonieta MC, Nix RN, Detweiler CS.
PLoS One. 2010 Feb 26;5(2):e9441.
PMID:

  • 20195482
  • [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Related citations

A protein important for antimicrobial peptide resistance, YdeI/OmdA, is in the periplasm and interacts with OmpD/NmpC.
Pilonieta MC, Erickson KD, Ernst RK, Detweiler CS.
J Bacteriol. 2009 Dec;191(23):7243-52. Epub 2009 Sep 18.
PMID:

  • 19767429
  • [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Related citations

Intracellular microbes and haemophagocytosis.
Silva-Herzog E, Detweiler CS.
Cell Microbiol. 2008 Nov;10(11):2151-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. Review.
PMID:

  • 18616693
  • [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Related citations